I’ve also heard suggestions that the i8’s design may not age well, because it’s so singular, truly of-the-moment. I think the opposite is true. The most collectible cars of any era are striking, rare, advanced and high-performing, and evoke nostalgia for their specific era.

—Lawrence Ulrich on the BMW i8

The BMW i8 is the first electric car that’s gotten me excited. The design just screams future, whereas Teslas are really just a step in styling above a Camry. Don’t aim to design something timeless, instead make your era timeless.

Oliver Peoples x Maison Kitsuné - Tokyo, s/s2013Chelsea Schuchman photographed by Brad Elterman
(via pas un autre)

Oliver Peoples x Maison Kitsuné - Tokyo, s/s2013
Chelsea Schuchman photographed by Brad Elterman

(via pas un autre)

neuromaencer:

original image by ammar awas/reuters

neuromaencer:

original image by ammar awas/reuters

Engineered Garments Hooded Long Bush Shirt

Engineered Garments Hooded Long Bush Shirt

Deborah Turbeville. Valentino Haute Couture, FW 2012-2013.
Vogue Italia, September 2012.

Shorts game strong.
(Photo by Chut Janthachotibutr)

Shorts game strong.

(Photo by Chut Janthachotibutr)

Stephen Goldblatt. The Beatles, Mad Day Out, 1968. (St. Pancras Old Church, Kings Cross, London)

Stephen Goldblatt. The Beatles, Mad Day Out, 1968.
(St. Pancras Old Church, Kings Cross, London)

A close, daily intimacy between two people has to be paid for: it requires a great deal of experience of life, logic, and warmth of heart on both sides to enjoy each other’s good qualities without being irritated by each other’s shortcomings and blaming each other for them.
believermag:

Drawing by Josephine Demme
Fiction Seminar
Ben Marcus
Technologies of Heartbreak 
This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 
2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates
2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell
2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe
3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson
3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 
4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy
4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing
4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles
4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles
5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard
See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

believermag:

Drawing by Josephine Demme

Fiction Seminar

Ben Marcus

Technologies of Heartbreak 

This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 

2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates

2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell

2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor

2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe

3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates

3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson

3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald

3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 

4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy

4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing

4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles

5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard

See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

Each close friend you have brings out a version of yourself that you could not bring out on your own. When your close friend dies, you are not only losing the friend, you are losing the version of your personality that he or she elicited.
Metropolis is New York by day; Gotham City is New York by night

Both Superman’s Metropolis and Batman’s Gotham City are said by some to be comic book representations of New York City, but the visions of both comics are very different. “Metropolis is New York by day; Gotham City is New York by night” is a statement that has been attributed to both comic book writers Frank Miller and John Byrne. 

Batman writer and editor Dennis O’Neil put it this way (although this exact quotation varies in several versions): “Gotham is Manhattan below Fourteenth Street at 3 a.m., November 28 in a cold year. Metropolis is Manhattan between Fourteenth and One Hundred and Tenth Streets on the brightest, sunniest July day of the year.

(From by Barry Popik)

mypantalones:

Golden Age - GQ Style China

In case you haven’t been keeping track (which you probably haven’t) GQ China has been killing it with their editorials. Having been a tennis player for basically all of my life, this is heavy inspiration for my personal wardrobe in the coming months. 

For S/S 2014, Zara blatantly rips off Tokihito Yoshida’s Bicycle Jacket for the Barbour Beacon line. The original Bicycle Jacket came out for the very first season of the Barbour Beacon Heritage x To-ki-to collaboration for A/W 2009, 5 years ago. The pattern of the venerable jacket was essentially unchanged for 3 years, with only variations on the materials and color. Then for S/S 2012, the jacket diverged/devolved into the “cycling shirt jacket” and “mount shirt jacket,” both of which were pale references to the original template.

This is by far one of my favorite pieces of outerwear and it’s pathetic that Zara would copy it nearly pocket for pocket. However, one can quickly tell by the photos that Zara cuts costs on materials and stitching, which are nowhere near as sturdy as Barbour’s quality, and it’s also missing the every-so-useful rear game pocket. One pays less with Zara, but at the expense of Yoshida’s intended functionality.

In the Mood for Love

In the Mood for Love