vintagegal:

Audrey Hepburn and Richard Avedon take publicity photos for Funny Face (1957)

vintagegal:

Audrey Hepburn and Richard Avedon take publicity photos for Funny Face (1957)

Look at these bloody hipsters.

Tres petit gangsters hipsters. I can hear the gunshots from Masculin, féminin.

What I love about Barbara Klemm’s work is how timelessly some of them reflect the human condition.  She’s has other photos of old China which are intriguing because of how things haven’t changed in over 25 years, like transporting goods on bikes, wearing scarves on windy days (we still get the occasional sandstorm), and the bicycle food vendors.  However, as someone’s who’s been seeing periodic glimpses of Beijing for the past decade, these scenes are fading, and they’ll soon turn to novelty (if they haven’t already for foreigners).

What speaks to me more deeply are gestures like the two figures dancing, the family sharing a park bench, or that little girl’s pout at the market.  The costumes may change, but the characters won’t.

(See more at the Museum für Moderne Kunst’s web site—it’s a pity not all her photos are online.)

rfarine:

Metamorphosis, New York Ballet, 1953

rfarine:

Metamorphosis, New York Ballet, 1953

Michael Rougier. Youth in Japan, 1964-ish.

(Shamelessly nicked from Old World Wisdom, here, here, n here.)

legrandcirque:

Photograph by Michael Rougier. Japan, 1964.

legrandcirque:

Photograph by Michael Rougier. Japan, 1964.

pxrxllxls:

Michael ROUGIER, Youth in Japan, 1964

Guilty of being on a vintage Asia kick lately.

That original Beijing hustle.

Barbara Klemm. Beijing, 1985.

That original Beijing hustle.

Barbara Klemm. Beijing, 1985.

Dig the minor detail of placing the text behind the people.

advertise-this:

Client: Ray-Ban

Agency: Cutwater

Anyone who knows me, knows that if I could I would buy every style of Ray-Ban under the sun. I love this brand. It’s basically the Converse Chuck Taylors of sunglasses - they’re timeless, they’re versatile, and they’re bold. What more could you want?

That’s why I love this campaign, showing the spanning history of Ray-Ban’s legendary style, while highlighting the brand’s bold coolness.  It’s still as relevant today as it was in 1950, which isn’t a feat easily performed. And I love a good period piece, so these print ads were everything I could ask for. A pleasant surprise while flipping through magazines this month.

Happy Birthday, Ray-Ban!

I thought this was just someone’s cool family photo, so thank you softfilm.
One of my biggest peeves with Tumblr is the lack of background information/credits with many photos.
(And props to fisherfolks for digging this up.)
softfilm:


Wah… cool photo! Sixties Shaw starlets feasting on sticky rice dumplings. That’s Fang Ying 方盈 standing. I’m not sure about who she’s handing the glass of tea. The one with downcast face is Li Ting 李婷, who ended up killing herself not long after this picture was taken. And last but not least is the incomparable Lily Ho 何莉莉, stuffing her face with food.

I thought this was just someone’s cool family photo, so thank you softfilm.

One of my biggest peeves with Tumblr is the lack of background information/credits with many photos.

(And props to fisherfolks for digging this up.)

softfilm:

Wah… cool photo! Sixties Shaw starlets feasting on sticky rice dumplings. That’s Fang Ying 方盈 standing. I’m not sure about who she’s handing the glass of tea. The one with downcast face is Li Ting 李婷, who ended up killing herself not long after this picture was taken. And last but not least is the incomparable Lily Ho 何莉莉, stuffing her face with food.

(Source: donaldddtrump)

lajetee:
Marcel Duchamp, Jacques Villon, Raymond Duchamp-Villon in Puteaux, Paris, 1914

lajetee:

Marcel Duchamp, Jacques Villon, Raymond Duchamp-Villon in Puteaux, Paris, 1914
Coney Island Elephant Brothel, 1885 (more info)

Coney Island Elephant Brothel, 1885 (more info)